Bits and Pieces: Rooibee Red Tea, White Castle and other Louisville food news from the web, 10.15.12

News

  • Louisville-based Rooibee Red Tea will be available in 100 Kroger stores. Full disclosure, this is the only cold tea that I enjoy, so this news makes me giddy. (Business First of Louisville)
  • Four students from Sullivan University’s Pastry Competition Team won three medals and a diploma from at an international culinary competition in Germany. (Sullivan University)
  • Fresh Healthy Vending, a vending machine company that offers healthful snacks like fruit and yogurt, has gotten its machines into a few Jefferson County Public Schools, but the process isn’t easy. (Insider Louisville)

Openings

Etc.

Bits and pieces: KFC expands, nutritious school lunches and other food news from the web, 12.13.10

  • KFC officials have their eyes on Africa, according to the Wall Street Journal. Yum! Brands, the Louisville-based parent company of KFC, expects to double its number of KFC outlets on the continent to 1,200 by 2014, according to the WSJ article.
  • Here’s another news item from the Wall Street Journal: Carnegie Mellon University researchers say that taking several minutes to repeatedly think about eating a certain food could make you less likely to want to actually eat that food. I’m going to have to disagree. There are days when I think about Raisin Bran Crunch for at least an hour, and I still eat a big bowl when I get home from work.
  • O’Charley’s Inc., one of my favorite casual-dining-with-good-rolls restaurants, is closing 16 of its locations, according to an article from Business First of Louisville. CEO David Head said:
These closings permit us to focus our energy and efforts on improving the performance of our remaining 339 company-operated restaurants in 25 states.
  • President Barack Obama signed a bill into law Monday that allows for thousands more children to eat lunches and dinners at school and makes all school food more nutritious, according to an article from the New York Times. From the article:

The $4.5 billion measure increases the federal reimbursement for free school lunches by 6 cents a meal at a time when many school officials say they can’t afford to provide the meals. The bill will also expand access to free lunch programs and allow 20 million additional after-school meals to be served annually in all 50 states. Most states now only provide money for after-school snacks.

Bits and pieces: McDonald’s weddings, hangover cures and other food news from the web, 10.26.10

  • Can honey help a hangover? How about rubbing lemon on your armpit? The Chicago Tribune provides a handy-dandy slideshow that debunks and confirms alleged remedies to hangovers. After a weekend of hanging with photographers at Mountain Workshops in Elizabethtown, I learned the best cure for a hangover is just not to drink at all. I’m still reeling.

 

  • As a kid, I enjoyed spaghetti sandwiches – a pile of Mama Eats’ spaghetti smashed between two slices of white bread. Now spaghetti tacos are a hit among the kid crowd, according to an article in the New York Times. The dish was featured on the show iCarly and sent tweens into a tizzy to recreate it.

 

  • Love McDonald’s as much as your significant other? If you live in Hong Kong, you can get married in the fast-food restaurant. According to an article in The Independent of London, Hong Kong McDonald’s locations will begin offering on-site wedding packages next year that include your choice of a wedding cake, made of apple pie or burgers. “People said they’d dated here, or met here, and wanted to get married here … We see this as a business chance,” said Helen Cheung Yuen-ling, McDonald’s Hong Kong director of corporate communications and relations.

 

  • Halloween has become good business for American farmers, according to an article in the Wall Street Journal. From the article:

Looking to diversify their sources of income, small farmers are expanding their “agritourism” or “agri-tainment” operations beyond the traditional pumpkin-picking, hayride and petting zoo. They’re erecting haunted mansions, dizzying corn mazes and other elaborate attractions on their properties. In some cases, they convert them into holiday spectacles and other themed exhibits to keep visitors coming for a longer season.