Bits and Pieces: Tom+Chee, distilleries and other Louisville food news, 9.10.12

(Blogger’s note: For more information about any of the items in this and subsequent round-ups, click on the source links at the end of the sentences.)

Openings

  • Homemade Ice Cream and Pie Kitchen will open a new location in Prospect. There are currently nine Pie Kitchen locations in Louisville and surrounding counties. (Pie Kitchen’s Facebook page)
  • Tom+Chee, a fancy-pants grilled cheese restaurant, is opening a location in Cardinal Towne on Cardinal Boulevard. The chain has a Bardstown Road location. (Tom+Chee’s Facebook page)
  • Queen of Sheba Ethiopian restaurant has opened a second, lunch-only location in downtown Louisville on S. Fifth Street. The restaurant’s main location is on Taylorsville Road. (Queen of Sheba’s website)

Events

  • Red Hot Roasters and Wiltshire on Market are hosting a coffee-themed dinner to benefit the Center for Women and Families on Sept. 19. (Consuming Louisville)
  • Yale architect students who visited Louisville and created designs for a downtown distillery have completed their work, and the designs will be on display through Sept. 24 at the corner of First and Main streets across from Whiskey Row downtown. (WFPL)

Know of other food news in Louisville and the surrounding area? Leave a comment or send me an email at ashleelclark@gmail.com.

Bits and pieces: Obama’s dog food, Jay-Z and other food news from the web, 8.17.11

  • In case you were wondering, Bo, President Barack Obama’s dog, eats store-bought dog food. There were rumors he was getting meals prepared by White House chefs. The White House declined to say whether Bo eats dry or wet food. Seriously. (Obama Foodorama)
  • Here’s a weird celebrity lawsuit story — world-renowned chimp researcher Jane Goodall is suing celebrity chef Tyler Florence over a line of baby food. (Gothamist)
  • I’ve talked a lot about American food deserts on Ashlee Eats. Here’s a great Q&A about the phenomenon. (The Week)
  • A group of doctors says that hot dogs can be as bad for your health as cigarettes. I’d rather have the hot dog — cigarettes just aren’t as good covered in mustard. (USA Today)
  • When you’re a famous rapper/mogul like Jay-Z, you can afford to leave a $50,000 tip after buying a quarter of $1 million worth of champagne. (People)

Bits and pieces: Happy Meals, colorful cauliflower and other food news from the web, 8.1.11

  • Starting in September, McDonald’s will add a serving of fruit or vegetable and reduce the portion of french fries in Happy Meals. The company is making the changes in response to criticism from health groups and parent organizations about the nutritional value of Happy Meals. When I was a tike, I had a cardboard box full of Happy Meal toys from all the Happy Meals I ate. Yes, I was a chubby kid. (LA Times)
  • A group of scientists say that drinking wine could help prevent sunburn. Like I needed another reason to make a pitcher of sangria. (The Telegraph)
  • One in six people change their order when a fast-food restaurant menu includes calorie count. But folks only reduce their intake by about 44 calories, the equivalent of one McNugget. (MSNBC)
  • A supermarket chain in the United Kingdom is selling cauliflower in colors like purple, yellow and green to get kids to eat more veggies. I don’t care what color you make it — I am a cauliflower hater. Yuck. (Daily Mail)

Bits and pieces: Michelle Obama, Quiznos death watch and other food news from the web, 7.25.11

  • “Our standard supermarket banana, a variety called Cavendish, may be at the brink of disaster.” That is definitely going to mess up my breakfast. (The Scientist)
  • First Lady Michelle Obama is trying to bring more fruits and vegetables to “food deserts” and is working with some big retailers to do so. (NPR)
  • And speaking of healthful living, should the government put a tax on junk food and subsidize produce to get Americans healthy? Food writer Mark Bittman argues that this idea is worth exploring. (New York Times)
  • Looks like business isn’t booming at Quiznos, a sandwich chain with a whole lot of debt. (Gawker)
  • Brooklyn restaurant Do or Dine serves foie gras doughnuts, and people are pissed about it. It just sounds kind of gross to me. (Gawker)

Bits and pieces: Cheesecake Factory, downtown distillery and other food news from the web, 7.11.11

  • Ever wanted to try all the cheesecake selections at the Cheesecake Factory? A group of writers did, and they lived to blog about it. And you can check out this slideshow to see if how many you have tried. (Serious Eats)
  • Some kids in a Cleveland suburb were robbed at their lemonade stand. The bandits made off with at least $13.50. Somewhere, an angel is crying. (Huffington Post)
  • A Michigan woman could face 93 days in jail for planting a vegetable garden in her front yard. Yikes. (Gawker)
  • A distillery is going to renovate and set up shop in a historic building in downtown Louisville. Operations are expected to begin n 2013. (Business First of Louisville)

Bits and pieces: Moldy foods, golden barbecue grills and other food news from the web, 6.6.11

 

  • Somebody thought it would be a great idea to create a $150,000, gold-plated barbecue grill. Other than Goldmember in the above clip, who needs this? (Best Week Ever)
  • Before the MyPlate, before the food pyramid, there was the food wheel that helped guide Americans on eating healthfully when there was a shortage of food supplies during World War II. (Good)
  • Ever find some mold on your bread and just tear the bad piece off (don’t worry, I won’t tell)? Not a good idea, because that mold runs deeper than you think. (Lifehacker)
  • And speaking of spoiled food, eating items after the “best by”  or “expiration” date isn’t too bad. Just watch out for mold. (Jezebel)
  • It is now safe to eat certain cuts of pork medium rare with an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. (Pork Be Inspired)

Bits and pieces: Ronald McDonald, coffee and other food news from the web, 5.23.11

  • Is Ronald McDonald a nice ol’ clown representing a big company, or is he just an example of predatory marketing that encourages kids to eat unhealthy food? Some people thinks it’s time to retire Ronald, but McDonald’s has decided to stand by its man. (NPR)
  • Coffee (or nectar of the gods, as I like to call it) can actually make you healthier. Where’s my cup? (The Atlantic)
  • I’m all for taking risks with fashion, but I’m not sure about a pizza beret. (Best Week Ever)
  • A cat-food brand has created iPad games for cats. Let the cuteness commence. (Gizmodo)
  • Chefs Eric Ripert and Tom Colicchio made a cameo on HBO’s Treme last night. I don’t have the channel, but I hear the show is fantastic. (Eater)

Bits and pieces: Chocolate milk, Chef Boyardee and other food news from the web, 5.16.11

  • Chef Boyardee of the canned Italian food brand was a real guy, and one of his relatives has written an Italian cookbook. (Time)
  • There’s a war going on in our schools. Public enemy number one – chocolate milk. (Huffington Post)
  • Want to help Japanese disaster relief efforts? Drink some sake (not that I really needed a reason). (The Kitchn)
  • A Wisconsin man is about to eat his 25,000th Big Mac. That wasn’t a typo. (Fond du Lac Reporter)

Bits and pieces: Starbucks’ Trenta, Flavor Flav and other food news from the web, 2.7.11

Put this in your cup and drink it. Photo courtesy of DieselDemon via Flickr.
  • Starbucks recently introduced a 31-ounce Trenta size for iced coffee. Not only is the mega-cup larger than the average human stomach, but you can fit a whole bottle of wine in there. (Eater)

 

  • There’s a big stink going on in Maine – and it’s all about whoopie pies. Some people want to make the whoopie pie the state’s official dessert. Others think it’s a bad idea to such a title to a dish whose main ingredient is lard, especially when obesity is prevalent throughout the state and country, and want the blueberry pie to reign. Oh, the things that divide our nation. (Boston Globe)

 

  • Flavor Flav is opening a fried chicken restaurant in Iowa. Ummm … yeah. (Eater)

 

  • Celebrity chef and author Jeff Henderson of Food Network‘s The Chef Jeff Project has written a “community cookbook” called America I Am: Pass It Down Cookbook that chronicles African-American history through cuisine. Excuse me while I add this book to my wish list. (NPR)

Bits and pieces: McDonald’s weddings, hangover cures and other food news from the web, 10.26.10

  • Can honey help a hangover? How about rubbing lemon on your armpit? The Chicago Tribune provides a handy-dandy slideshow that debunks and confirms alleged remedies to hangovers. After a weekend of hanging with photographers at Mountain Workshops in Elizabethtown, I learned the best cure for a hangover is just not to drink at all. I’m still reeling.

 

  • As a kid, I enjoyed spaghetti sandwiches – a pile of Mama Eats’ spaghetti smashed between two slices of white bread. Now spaghetti tacos are a hit among the kid crowd, according to an article in the New York Times. The dish was featured on the show iCarly and sent tweens into a tizzy to recreate it.

 

  • Love McDonald’s as much as your significant other? If you live in Hong Kong, you can get married in the fast-food restaurant. According to an article in The Independent of London, Hong Kong McDonald’s locations will begin offering on-site wedding packages next year that include your choice of a wedding cake, made of apple pie or burgers. “People said they’d dated here, or met here, and wanted to get married here … We see this as a business chance,” said Helen Cheung Yuen-ling, McDonald’s Hong Kong director of corporate communications and relations.

 

  • Halloween has become good business for American farmers, according to an article in the Wall Street Journal. From the article:

Looking to diversify their sources of income, small farmers are expanding their “agritourism” or “agri-tainment” operations beyond the traditional pumpkin-picking, hayride and petting zoo. They’re erecting haunted mansions, dizzying corn mazes and other elaborate attractions on their properties. In some cases, they convert them into holiday spectacles and other themed exhibits to keep visitors coming for a longer season.